Earls in Devon and Aunts in Wales: author interview with Regency Romance writer Jayne Davis

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Cover reveal for the first book in the Marstone Series

I’m delighted to host an interview today with Jayne Davis, author of the Marstone Series, historical romance spanning the eighteenth to nineteenth centuries with a big dash of adventure. The first of the series, Sauce for the Gander, came out on Kindle yesterday. A standalone book which is loosely linked to the series, The Mrs MacKinnons, debuted last year and has already built up a firm fan base. Jayne, welcome to Queens, Quotes, Quills and Quests. Tell us more about the Marstone series.

Jayne: I started writing fiction for fun, and had drafts of novels called Playing with Fire and The Mrs MacKinnons done before I decided to take things seriously and knock them into shape to be published. I dealt with The Mrs MacKinnons first, and in that process I learned a lot about marketing books.

Tea Plantations under sky
Jayne’s debut, a standalone novel that links with the Marstone series

One of the things I learned was that books in a series sell well – readers like familiar characters. An important secondary character in Playing with Fire also has a walk-on role in The Mrs MacKinnons (the Earl of Marstone, for anyone who has read the latter). I thought he would make a good linking character for the series, so I went back in time and wrote the story of how Will, who later becomes the Earl of Marstone, falls in love and ends up in the position we see him in later (I’m not going to say what that is as it’s a bit of a spoiler for the novel). His story is in Sauce for the Gander. Playing with Fire is set 16 years later, so I want to write about one of Will’s sisters for Book 2, and Playing with Fire will become Book 3. I have ideas for one or two more books after that as well.

Lynden: Excellent. The series is growing. What made you choose historical romance as your genre?

Jayne: I enjoyed Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen in my teens, and always wanted to write stories in this era. There are a lot of restrictions on the characters that we do not have, and these can provide great possibilities for stories. I’m not only talking about things like lack of women’s rights, but also more mundane things like no analgesics, letters taking days to reach their recipients, going abroad taking weeks or months, if you weren’t shipwrecked on the way, and so on.

Lynden: That’s very true. I’d not looked at history quite like that before. Now, you’re clearly very productive (I know this because I can view all Jayne’s draft novels on Scribophile, the online forum we both belong to.) What’s your way of working? Do you have a daily routine, or does writing fit in with other commitments?

Jayne: I started off as an engineer, then became a teacher, then a publisher of school science text books. During this third career I started writing some of the text books and discovered I was quite good at it. So after only a few years in that job I went freelance, and I’ve been earning a decent living by freelance writing ever since. I’m lucky in that I can accept work or not, and can usually say I only want to work half days – this leaves me half of each week for fiction writing, and even more time when I haven’t any science writing on.

Sadly, I’m still very poor at making use of my time. I waste too much time on the internet instead of buckling down and getting on with it. I do try to buckle down and get some writing done each morning, but it doesn’t always work!

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Jayne hard at work. It’s research!

Lynden: Ah, that’s a very common problem among writers. How about ideas? Where do you get your ideas from?

Jayne: I don’t know – they just come! Not always when I want them to, though. Odd things can set off a train of thought. For example, I was on a walking holiday in Wales last year – 5 days across the middle of Wales in beautiful countryside. I got to thinking about a few Regency Romances I’d read where a heroine was threatened with the punishment of being sent to an aunt in Wales or, in one of Heyer’s books, going to said aunt for protection against a horrible father. So the ‘aunt in Wales’ of this trope appears to be rather dragonish (quite appropriate for Wales, really). Then I got to wondering what would happen to my heroine if she found when she got there that the aunt wasn’t the dragon that her father thought, and the plot for An Embroidered Spoon was born.

Lynden: I wonder why so many Regency aunts lived in Wales? How curious. My next question is, what’s the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever received? And what’s the worst?

Jayne: Best – first drafts can be fixed, just keep writing and get on with it.

Worst – that’s harder. Probably the most useless and irritating was an American critiquer who ignored my comment about the work being written in British English, and added a . after every Mr and Mrs in the chapter.

Lynden: Mmm, that doesn’t sound wildly helpful. Whose writing do you admire most? I’d be interested to see if it’s an author in your genre or not.

Jayne: That’s a difficult question! At the moment most of my reading is within the genre I write, or non-fiction books about the period. So I’ll give you a fiction answer – Courtney Milan and Emily Larkin both write excellent stories with characters I can believe in, and both good for period detail. Larkin has some paranormal elements in her stories that I don’t normally like, but she does it well.

Lynden: I’m not familiar with Emily Larkin. I’ll have to look her up. Tell us more about your freelance work. What are the similarities and differences between writing fiction and non-fiction, in your experience?

Jayne: My non-fiction is all commissioned. School textbooks these days are a huge undertaking, with all sorts of teacher support materials and worksheets, so the authors are very much part of a team. There is a detailed writing brief that sets out not only what needs to go in each section (based on the curriculum), but also the educational features needed, how many illustrations I can use, and so on. And a schedule for when each bit has to be delivered. So in many ways that is far easier than fiction writing, and someone else does all the proofing, publishing, marketing and sales.

But it’s nowhere near as much fun as thinking up characters and telling their stories (and in some cases having what were supposed to be very minor characters elbowing their way into the story!)

Lynden: That’s so true! So, Jayne, thank you for visiting. If this piece has whetted my readers’ appetite, where can they find your books, and for those of us who are suckers for a shiny cover, is paperback an option as well as Kindle?

Jayne: The Mrs MacKinnons is available in Kindle, Kindle Unlimited and in paperback from Amazon. It can also be ordered from bookshops in paperback.

At the time of writing, Sauce for the Gander is only available in Kindle and Kindle Unlimited, but will be available in paperback soon.

You can find out more about Jayne by:

checking out her website

following her on Facebook @Jaynedavisromance

following her on Twitter@Jayndavis142

Sauce 3D jpg

 

 

 

Boneless Vikings, Outrageous Quotes, a Literary Cat and Handel – Bookish Dublin

The Long Room, Trinity College
The Long Room, Trinity College Dublin

I’ve delayed so long in writing this blog post that I find it now coincides with Reading Ireland Month – a lucky coincidence for me!

City breaks are perhaps the best solution to the problem of a family holiday with two older teenagers keen to remind us of all the downsides to breaks in the UK. The Wade family all found something interesting here, although our tastes only collided at dinner time. It’s possible I made a mistake not visiting Dublin’s Leprechaun museum like our daughter did, but the city’s literary delights that I did visit offered me a wealth of visual and creative delights nonetheless. Photos can largely tell the story of this visit.

 

4. Oscar Wilde statue again
Oscar Wilde, Merrion Square

We arrived on a wet Sunday afternoon, and while our teenagers elected to make the most of their hotel beds, Rick and I visited Merrion Square, the park Oscar Wilde overlooked as a child. He’s honoured by a flamboyant statue (statues are big in Dublin) and a pillar covered in some of his outrageous and insightful quotes. Do I agree with the one second from bottom in this photo? If so, my day job is far less worthy than I thought!

3. Oscar Wilde quotes
Oscar Wilde quotes

 

Our trip back to the town centre took us past a sculpture commemorating Ivar the Boneless, founder of Viking Dublin. Viking surnames of the heroic era are rich and strange, and Ivar’s is one of my favourite. There are many stories and theories as to how he got his name, but I favour the wilder ones that have him carried into battle on a shield due to his inability to walk: in this one, his military daring was clearly stronger than his physical strength. The legends of Ivar link with those of Ragnar Hairy Breaches, whose murder purportedly caused the Viking invasion of England and through Ragnar to the Saga of the Volsungs (Ragnar’s wives included Sigurd and Brynhild’s daughter) and the rich family line of East Anglia (one of the legends of Ragnar’s death has him murdered by a courtier of Edmund, last in the royal line that might link back to Beowulf. There’s a story here I mean to write one day.

11. Ivarr the Boneless, Steine
Ivar the Boneless pillar

As well as statues, Dublin is rich in wall murals, and these too commemorate the literary heritage of the city.

27. Pub with Irish folklore paintings - figure from Ullyses
James Joyce mural
22. Irish folklore painting
Mural on a pub wall

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82. great fresco near Victorian pub
A mural…
83. great fresco near Victorian pub
…and the caption

But the frontages are just as delightful.

24. Pub with Irish folklore paintings

A must for book lovers is the Book of Kells exhibition, housed in Trinity College Library.

53. Book of Kells exhibition
Book of Kells, c.800 AD

The book itself is under glass and so only one spread is viewable, but there is plenty of information in the exhibition, supported by large photos from this or other examples of medieval book illumination.

48. Book of Kells exhibition
The medieval publication process – professional vellum-maker

Here is one from the 13c, showing a professional vellum-maker showing a monk one of his sheets for book production, while another is being stretched on a frame waiting for the vellum-maker to scrape the hairs off it with the curved knife leaning against it. Another shows and illustrates a lovely poem about a writer and his cat. The bond it celebrates is celebrated today via social media, but the cat’s role as cat-catcher has been replaced by havoc-maker. As I write this, our cat is sitting on my folder of research.

50. Book of Kells exhibition
Pangur Ban, 9c poem, translated

The highlight of the exhibition, however, for me, must be the library itself, a celebration of books and authors. I want to climb a spiral staircase, pick a book and sit at the top reading.

55. The Long Room, Trinity College
How to fit more books into your space
104. St Patrick's Cathedral
St Patrick’s Cathedral

St Patrick’s Cathedral is full of visual delights, including a manuscript of Handel’s Messiah, which had its first ever performance here, in 1742. It went on to be a popular item at London’s Foundling Hospital, where the ticket fee went into the charity’s funds. Libby, in my novel ‘Foundlings‘, would have heard it many times. My photo of the music didn’t come out very well so here’s some street art to illustrate it instead.

41. Handel
Handel distracted from conducting a performance

Dublin is rich in architecture from the age of Handel, and Georgian doorways are everywhere.

However, for me the highlight of our holiday was a visit to Fourteen Henrietta Street, which deserves a blog post to itself. Watch this feed!